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Children’s Literature Annotated Bibliography

Info: 10112 words (40 pages) Dissertation
Published: 10th Dec 2019

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Tags: English Literature

Annotated Bibliography

Table of Contents

Newbery Award or Honor

Last Stop on Market Street (2015) ………………………………………………. 4

Because of Winn-Dixie (2000) …………………………………………………… 5

Caldecott Award or Honor

The Man Who Walked Between the Towers (2003) ……………………………. 6

A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever (2008) ……………………………. 7

Coretta Scott King or Honor

Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me (2013) ………………………………………… 8

I, Too, Am America (2012) ……………………………………………………… 9

Trombone Shorty (2015) ………………………………………………………… 10

Radiant Child: The story of young artist Jean – Michel Basquiat (2016) ………. 11

Pura Belpre Award or Honor

Mango, Abuela, and Me (2015) …………………………………………………. 12

Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras (2015) ……………… 13

Wordless Book

A Ball for Daisy (2011) …………………………………………………………. 14

Children’s Notable Books

Prudence Wants a Pet (2011) …………………………………………………… 15

Bear Has a Story to Tell (2012) ………………………………………………… 16

Poetry Books

Won Ton: A Cat Tale Told in Haiku (2011) ……………………………… 17 – 18

Children with Disabilities

My Brother Sammy is Special (1999) …………………………………………. 19

Rain Reign (2014) ……………………………………………………………… 20

Biography

Me… Jane (2011) ………………………………………………………………. 21

Informational

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation (2014) ………………………………………………………………………………… 22

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina & New Orleans (2015) ……………………… 23

Sneider Family Book

Somebody, Please Tell Me Who I Am (2012) …………………………………. 24

Folk Tales

Dust Devil (2010) ………………………………………………………………. 25

Historical Fiction

Full of Beans (2016) …………………………………………………………… 26

The Game of Silence (2005) …………………………………………………… 27

Fantasy

Charlotte’s Web (1980) ………………………………………………………… 28

The Hunger Games (2008) ………………………………………………… 29 – 30

Tomas Rivera Award or Honor

Maybe Something Beautiful (2016) …………………………………………… 31

What Can You Do with a Paleta (2009) ………………………………………. 32

Graphic Novel

Coraline (2008) …………………………………………………………………. 33

Science Fiction

Return to Plant Tad (2014) ……………………………………………………… 34

The Computer Nut (1984) ……………………………………………………… 35

CATEGORY

Newbery Award or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

De La Pena, M. (2015). Last stop on market street. (C. Robinson, Illus.). New York: Penguin Group

SUMMARY

The Last Stop on Market Street is about a young boy named CJ and his grandmother riding a bus to get to their stop on Market Street. While on the bus ride, CJ’s grandmother teaches him to appreciate the world around him, and not worry about the things he is lacking. Illustrator Christian Robinson, uses warm vibrant colors and movement to help the audience see the magic in this story.

 

Genre & Format: Print Book; Fiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 3 – 8

Awards: 2016 Newbery Medal Winner

2016 Caldecott Honor Book

2016 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Honor Book

2015 E. B. White Read Aloud Award Honor, Picture Book

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This is an appealing story to children in the lower levels of elementary school because it teaches the child to appreciate their life and the community they live in. With the simple language that the Last Stop on Market Street uses, the crayon illustrations follow the flow of movement to explain the actions that are taking place in each scene. This book can be used in an educational setting by having the child understand that their classroom is a community. I would recommend this book for purchase because it shows the value of connection.

CATEGORY

Newbery Award or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

DiCamillo, K. (2000) Because of Winn-Dixie. Somerville: Candlewick Press

SUMMARY

Because of Winn-Dixie is about a girl named Opal who found a stray dog in a grocery store. She took the dog home and she began to understand the power of friendship and forgiveness. The only illustration that the book has is the book cover, which is created out of ink and paint to depict what Winn-Dixie looked like to the audience

 

Genre & Format: Paperback, Realistic Fiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 2 – 6

 

Awards: Newbery Honor book
Parents’ Choice® Gold Award Winner

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This book would be appealing to elementary students because it teaches them about the power of friendship. Because of Winn-Dixie could be used in an educational setting by informing students about caring for their environment and community by establishing relationships. I would recommend that schools purchase this for their library because it connects students to how your actions can change a person’s life whether it is big or small.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CATEGORY

Caldecott Award or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Gerstein, M. (2003). The Man who walked between the towers. Brookfield: Roaring Brook Press.

SUMMARY

Set in 1974 in New York City, Philippe, who is a saw that rise of the twin towers and came up with a plan to walk the tightrope between the buildings. After coming up with a plan, Philippe and his friends put up the tightrope, and he began to walk and do tricks on the rope. Author and Illustrator Mordicai Gerstein uses three-point perspective and oil painting to show the bold theme in this award-winning story.

Genre & Format: Picture Book; Nonfiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 5 – 9

Awards: 2004 Caldecott Medal Winner

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

The Man Who Walked Between the Towers would be appealing to elementary students because it teaches children the importance of perseverance and the ability to follow your dreams. The ink, three-point perspective, and oil painting illustrations and lyrical vocabulary, helps the audience feel the intensity of Philippe walking between the tightropes. This book could be used in the intermediate school setting because it can teach students the history behind the twin towers and how remembering them after they fell. I would highly recommend this book for purchase in a school library because it connects to our history and helps students understand important events in history.

CATEGORY

Caldecott Award or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Frazee, M. (2008). A couple of boys have the best week ever. New York: HMH Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever, is about two boys that are friends called Eamon and James who meet at Bill and Pam’s, which are Eamon’s grandparents, house to go to nature camp. The last night before they went home, they made Antarctica out of different colored rocks and a stick. The illustrations are drawn with Prismacolor, which helps the outlining of each piece look defined and elegant.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover, Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 1 – 3

 

Awards: 2009 Caldecott Honor

2008 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor for Picture Book

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Everwould be appealing to the lower elementary levels because it shows them the power of friendship. Illustrator Marla Frazee captures the energy and playfulness of the characters. This book can be used in an educational setting to teach students about nature. The teacher can make a day for a nature walk or go on a field trip to capture the attention of the students. I would recommend this book for purchase because it gives students the opportunity for open-ended play time.

CATEGORY

Coretta Scott King or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Beaty, D. (2013). Knock Knock: My dad’s dream for me. (B. Collier, Illus.). New York: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Taking place in a suburban area, Knock Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me, is about a young boy who plays a game with his dad every morning, but experiences his dad’s absence. In his dad’s presence, he experiences the meaning of hard work and what that means to follow his dreams. Illustrator Bryan Collier, uses watercolor and collage patterns to help the words and illustrations come together in a realistic way.

 

Genre & Format: Print Book; Realistic Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 1 – 4

 

Awards: 2014 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Knock Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me is a sweet story for families who are experiencing going through divorce or just experiencing loss of a parent. The detailed contrast from light to dark shading that the illustrator uses helps the imaginary mind see vivid images as if you were there in the setting. This book could be used in an educational setting to teach students the importance of family and how it is important to work hard in school. I would purchase this book for a school library because it helps students to connect to their feelings, but also for the teacher to help build a relationship with students who are in asimiliar situation.

 

 

CATEGORY

Coretta Scott King or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Hughes, L. (2012). I, too, am america. (B. Collier, Illus.). New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Through the powerful words of Langston Hughes, I, Too, Am America, is written to depict a time a segregation and the hope that one day the nation will be equal. Illustrator Bryan Collier uses mixed media to help the audience follow the story.

 

Genre & Format: Picture Book; Nonfiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 1 – 3; 9 – 12

 

Awards: 2013 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

I, Too, Am America would be appealing to most age levels because it teaches students the history of segregation and how far our country has come to change its ways. The use of the American Flag is powerful and shows the audience that no matter what race a person is, that everyone is America. This book could be used in an educational setting by connecting world issues with historical issues to see how our current nation compares or contrast from the previous. I would purchase this this book for school libraries, but make sure that younger children understand the meaning of the book unless a child could be lost among the text and illustrations.

CATEGORY

Coretta Scott King or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Andrews, T. (2015). Trombone shorty. (B. Collier, Illus.). New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Set in Tremé, New Orleans, Louisiana, Trombone Shorty is raised up around music and formed a passion for wanting to learn to play music. He experienced privileges like playing with his brother’s band and being onstage with Bo Diddley. Illustrator Brian Collier, uses watercolor and collage to piece intricate illustrations to tell the story of Trombone Shorty.

 

Genre & Format: Print Book; Autobiography, Nonfiction

Suggest Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 6 – 12

 

Awards: 2016 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award

                2016 Caldecott Honor Book

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This book would attract students in elementary because all children have passions. One illustration provides a hidden image of Trombone Shorty. The illustrations show the empowerment of how one person’s dream and passion became a reality. Trombone Shorty can be used in an educational setting to teach students about culture and music through creating instruments during art class. I would purchase this book for a school library because it can connect with the dreams of students and help them define what it means to follow them.

CATEGORY

Coretta Scott King or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Steptoe, J. (2016). Radiant Child: The story of young artist Jean – Michel Basquiat. New York: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Set in Brooklyn, Radiant Child is based on the dreams of a young boy who wants to be an artist. He experiences the illness of his mother, but triumphs and becomes a famous artist. The illustrations created by Javaka Steptoe uses watercolor and mixed media to create a collage to help the sound of Basquiat’s story come to life.

 

Genre & Format: Picture Book; Nonfiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 6 – 12

 

Awards: 2017 Randolph Caldecott Medal Winner

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Radiant Child attracts students in elementary because it tells students that art does not need to be clean and neat, but can be created in any shape or form they want. With the illustrations that Jean – Michel draws the audience can feel the kid-like paintings as if they were the ones creating them. I would use this book in an educational setting where the child can create a piece of art after the book is read to them. This book should be purchased because it would teach the children the importance of treasuring every creation they make.

CATEGORY

Pura Belpre or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Medina, M. (2015). Mango, abuela, and me. (A. Dominguez, Illus.). Somerville: Candlewick Press

SUMMARY

Mango, Abuela, and Me is about a young girl named Mia who finds out that her abuela cannot speak English. She went to the store and bought her abuela a parrot and placed sticky notes on every item in the house. This would help her grandma learn the language so they can communicate. The illustrator Angela Dominguez, uses marker to help every illustration to be outlined and stand out on the page.

 

Genre & Format: Print Book; Fiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades Pre-K – 2

Awards: 2016 Pura Belpre Author Award Honor Book

2016 Pura Belpre Illustrator Award Honor Book

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This book would be an interesting read for younger children because every person experiences friendship with other people who do not come from an English-speaking family. The marker illustrations help the characters to stand out. This book can be used in an educational setting for teachers and students to learn simple Spanish vocabulary to communicate to the students who are English Language Learners. Mango, Abuela, and Me should be purchased for school libraries because it shows children the power of inclusiveness.

CATEGORY

Pura Belpre or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Tonatiuh, D. (2015). Funny Bones: Posada and his day of the dead calaveras. New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Funny Bones is about a boy named Jose Guadalupe Posada who liked to draw things he saw out of books. He learned the art of printing and when he was older he had a shop of his own. He soon moves to Mexico where he learned about Dia de Muertos; Day of the Dead, and started to draw calaveras (skeletons). Each hand drawn illustration complements the text.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Biography

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s):  Ages9 – 13

 

Awards:2016 Sibert Medal

2017 Pennsylvania Young Readers’ Choice Award Nominee for Grades 3 – 6

2016 Tomas Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award

2015 Kirkus Prize Nominee for Young Readers’ Literature (Finalist)

2016 Pura Belpre Honor for Illustration

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This would be appealing to ages 9 – 13 because it teaches them about heritage. The illustrations are from different artists, but together it unifies how important calaveras are to the Mexican culture and how Posada’s legacy still lives on. This book can be used in an educational setting during different cultures week because the class can create treats, artwork, etc. to celebrate the holiday. I would recommend this book for school libraries because it shows the value of life and death.

CATEGORY

Wordless Book

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Raschka, C. (2011). A Ball for Daisy. New York: Schwarts & Wade Books

SUMMARY

A Ball for Daisy is about a dog that loves playing with its ball until one day another dog busted it. The dog is unhappy but the dog that bust his ball came with its owner to deliver another ball to the dog. Chris Raschka uses gouache to render the illustrations, which made the audience understand the story easily.

 

Genre & Format: Picture Book

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 0 – 6

 

Awards: 2012 Caldecott Medal Winner

PERSONAL REVIEW OR REFLECTION

This book attracts younger children with its choice of color and shows the attachment that a feline or a child can have with a toy. This book can be used in an educational setting to help student form sentence with words that they are not familiar with to increase their vocabulary. Purchasing this book will be the right decision for school libraries to make because it shows students that not every story is created with words.

CATEGORY

Children’s Notable Book

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Daly, C. (2011). Prudence wants a pet. (S. King, Illus.). New York: Roaring Brook Press

SUMMARY

The main character Prudence, in Prudence Wants a Pet, takes on a journey of having inanimate objects as a pet because her reasons why they are not going to get her a pet. Soon her parents realize how much she really wants a pet, and eventually buys her one. The illustrations are done in pen and ink to tell the actions that Prudence takes in this notable book.

 

Genre & Format: Picture Book; Realistic Fiction

Suggested Age of Grade Level(s): Grades Head Start – 1

 

Awards: ALA Notable Children’s Books

Washington Children’s Choice PB Award Master List

Illinois Monarch Award: K-3 Children’s Choice Award

Nebraska Golden Sower Award Master List

American Library Association Notable Children’s Books

Washington Children’s Choice PB Award ML

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Prudence Wants a Pet, is a classic example of how children use their imaginations when they want something but their parents are not willing to buy it, which makes this an appealing story to younger elementary level students. King’s illustrations are simple yet the intricate color scheme captivates the highs and lows of Prudence’s journey throughout the story. This story can be used in an educational setting by teaching kids the value of patience and exploring the world of imagination. Prudence Wants a Pet should be in school libraries because it connects with students.

 

 

 

 

 

CATEGORY

Children’s Notable Book

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Stead, P. (2012). Bear has a story to tell. (E. Stead, Illus.). New York: Roaring Brook Press

SUMMARY

Bear Has a Story to Tell is about a bear that is getting ready for winter and wants to tell a story to his friends, but they do not have time because they are also getting ready for winter. Bear goes to sleep and wakes during spring ready to tell his story. Illustrator Erin Stead, hand draws and paints each image to portray each character as realistic as possible for the reader.

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages2 – 5

 

Awards: 2013 Notable Children’s Books Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This story appeals to younger readers because of its simplistic text. Each illustration has a white background which helps the characters stand out to see the beautiful fall colors. This book can be used in an educational setting for a student’s nap time to help them fall asleep and is a good way to teach about hibernation. Bear Has a Story to Tell is a good story to buy because it connects students to nature and shows the process that each animal needs to take to be ready for spring.

CATEGORY

Poetry Book

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Wardlaw, L. (2011). Won – Ton: A cat tale told in haiku. (E. Yelchin, Illus.). New York: Henry Holt and Company

SUMMARY

Won Ton is about a cat named Haiku that is in an animal shelter that awaits adoption. This story highlights the things Haiku does not like, but in the end, he becomes comfortable and tells his owner his true name. Illustrator Eugene Yelchin uses a combination of graphite and watercolor to create the illustrations of Won Ton: A Cat Tale Told in Haiku.

 

Genre & Format: Poetry; Haiku

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 2 – 4

 

Awards: 2014 Prairie Pasque (South Dakota) Young Reader Award Nominee

2014 Nevada Young Readers Award Nominee

2014 Young Hoosier (Indiana) Book Award Nominee

2014 Sequoyah (Oklahoma) Children’s Book Award Nominee

2014 Grand Canyon (Arizona) Young Reader Award Nominee

2013 Winner, Chickadee (Maine) Reader’s Choice Award (Picture Books)

2013 Beehive (Utah) Poetry Book Award Winner

2013 North Carolina Children’s Book Award Nominee

2013 AudioFile Magazine Earphones Award Winner

2013 Mockingbird (Texas) Award Nominee

2013 Chuckwagon (Texas) Picture Book Reading List

2013 California Readers – California Collections List

2013 Kentucky Bluegrass Award Nominee (Grades K-2)

2013 Armadillo (Texas) Readers’ Choice Award Nominee

2013 Red Dot Children’s Choice Award Nominee (Singapore)

2013 Rhode Island Children’s Book Award Finalist (3rd Place)

2012-13 Pennsylvania Young Reader’s Choice Award Nominee

2012-2013 Mentor Text, Young Writers’ Project, North Dakota Reading Association

2012-2013 Surrey Schools Picture Book of the Year Nominee (British Columbia

Teacher-Librarians Association)

2012-2013 Fiction Diggers List

2012 NCTE/CLA Notable Children’s Book in the English Language Arts

2012 SCBWI Crystal Kite Members’ Choice Award – California/Texas Region

2012 San Francisco Book Festival – Best Children’s Book

2012 Myra Cohn Livingston Poetry Award

2012 Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award

2012 CCBC Best Children’s Books of the Year

2012 ALSC Notable Children’s Books

2012 Los Angeles Book Festival – Best Children’s Book

2012 Nominee: Capitol Choices Noteworthy Books for Children

2012 Nominee: Sakura Award (Japanese Children’s Choice Award)

2012 Recommended Reading List, Reading Circle Committee, Missouri State Teachers

Association

2012 Librarians’ Choices List

2011-12 AISLE (Indiana) Read-Alouds Too Good to Miss List

2011 SLJ Best Books of the Year

2011 Washington Post Best Books of the Year

2011 Cat Writers’ Association Muse Medallion (Best Children’s Book)

2011 Fancy Feast Best Friends Award (Best Children’s Book)

2011 Forward National Literature Award (Best Picture Book)

2011 NYPL Best Books of the Year – Poetry

2011 NYPL 100 Books for Reading and Sharing

2011 BSCE/CBC Monthly Pick (April)

2011 Lasting Connections List – Book Links Magazine

2011 Nerdies Award (Poetry)

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Won Ton would be appealing to younger aged students because it teaches students how the adoption process of animals goes. The illustrations show movement so that it gives depth to the story. I would use this in an educational setting to show students the value of money and have it be an opportunity to have the students decide on a class pet. Purchasing this book is highly recommended because students can learn the poetry form of haiku.

CATEGORY

Children with Disabilities

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Edwards, B. (1999). My brother sammy is special. (D. Armitage, Illus.). New York: Sky Pony Press

SUMMARY

My Brother Sammy is Special is written about a young boy that has a brother with a disability. He sees the difference between the way he plays versus his brother. Sammy’s older brother embraces the differences between them and starts to see things from Sammy’s eyes.  The illustrations are hand painted and helps the story’s appeal.

 

Genre & Format: Picture Book; General Fiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades Head Start – 3

 

Awards: 2002 Dolly Gray Award

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This book is appealing to therapists, parents, and children who needs to know about how a sibling reacts to having a brother or sister with a disability. David Armitage uses the painted illustrations to create a warm and loving color palette to help the audience feel the emotions of the characters. My Brother Sammy is Special can be used in an educational setting to inform students on what it means to have a disability. I feel that this book should be purchased in school libraries because it helps students understand that everyone is different.

 

CATEGORY

Children with disabilities

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Martin, A. (2014). Rain reign. New York: Feiwel and Friends

SUMMARY

Rain Reign is about a fifth grader named Rose who has Asperger’s, which is a form of autism. Rose likes homonyms and has a dog named Rain. There was a storm that flooded the area where Rose lives and Rain goes missing, which puts Rose out of her comfort zone when she tries to find him. Ann Martin uses imagery and uses pathos, egos, and logos to reel in the audience to tell this heartwarming story.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover, Realistic Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 7 – 13

 

Awards: 2015 Schneider Family Book Award for Middle School

2015 Josette Frank Award for Older Readers

2016 Pennsylvania Young Readers’ Choice Award Nominee for Grades 3-6

2016 Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award Nominee

2016 Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis Nominee for Kinderbuch

2017 Bluestem Book Award Nominee

2016 Dolly Gray Children’s Literature Award

2015 NCTE Charlotte Huck Award

 

PERSONAL REVIEW OR REFLECTION

Rain Reign would attract ages nine to thirteen because it shows them that everyone is different and you should not change the aspects of yourself that makes you unique. I would recommend purchasing this story because it is a good way for teachers to explain what a disability is to student and their family. This book also provides a lot of vocabulary words that students can learn and is a good way to have a student write about an animal that they are close and comfortable with. Rain Reign should be purchased for school libraries because it is a good discussion book and can be used for a variety of core related subjects.

CATEGORY

Biography

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

McDonnell, P. (2011). Me… Jane. New York: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Me… Jane is about a young girl named Jane who loved looking at nature. She imagines a life where she helps animals in Africa, and soon her dream becomes a reality. Each illustration that was created in watercolor and ink depicted the different stages in Jane’s story.

Genre & Format: Picture Book; Nonfiction

Suggest Age and Grade Level(s): Ages 3 – 10

 

Awards: 2012 Caldecott Medal Honor

2012 Charlotte Zolotow Award Winner

2012 Orbis Pictus Recommended Book

               Booklist Lasting Connections of 2012, Science

ALA Notable Children’s Book 2012, Younger

               Booklist Top 10 Books for Youth 2012, Environment

               Booklist 2011 Editors’ Choice, Top of the List, Youth Picture Book

Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2011

               NY Times Best Illustrated Children’s Books of 2011

              The New York Times Notable Children’s Books of 2011, Picture Books

2012 Notable Children’s Book in the English Language Arts

2012 CCBC Choices

2011 Cybils Awards, Fiction Picture Books, Winner

NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People 2012, Biography

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This biography would attract the ages of three to ten because all children have a dream of what they want to be when they are older. Patrick McDonnell’s illustrations help the readers to see the use of realism in the watercolor and ink illustrations. Me… Jane can be used in an educational setting by having the book read at story time and the students go outside on a nature walk. After the walk, the student can create a story and an artwork related to the walk they went on. I would recommend this book for purchase because it connects students to the world of nature around them.

CATEGORY

Informational

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Tonatiuh, D. (2014). Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & her family’s fight for desegregation. New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Separate is Never Equal is about a family that faces rejection when trying to enroll their children in a privileged school. Sylvia experiences people teasing her but she realizes the effort that her parents went through to get her into the school. The hand-drawn digitally colored illustrations makes you contemplate on the past and how far our nation has come.

 

Genre & Format: Print Book; Nonfiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 1 – 4

 

Awards: 2015 Pura Belpre Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Duncan Tonatiuh highlights the value of treating everyone equally, which is a good lesson to that would appeal to elementary students. Each hand drawn illustration captivates the fight that Sylvia and her family had to go through. I would use this book to inform the students about bullying and why it is important not to do it. Separate is Never Equal should be bought for school libraries because it connects students to past historical events and how you should treat people the way you should be treated.

 

 

CATEGORY

Informational

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Brown, D. (2015). Drowned City: hurricane katrina & new orleans. New York: HMH Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

In the year of 2005 in New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina hits the gulf and brings turmoil to the population of the state of Louisiana. Katrina leaves many individuals without a home and kills over one thousand four hundred individuals. Illustrator Don Brown, uses digital painting to help the mood of the story.

 

Genre & Format: Print Book; Biography, Nonfiction

Suggest Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 8 – 18

 

Awards: 2016 Sibert Honor

2015 Booklist Editors’ Choice: Books for Youth

2016 Great Graphic Novels for Teens

2016 Notable Children’s Books

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Drowned City would be appealing to students of any age level because it teaches them about natural disasters. The illustrations brought a sense of sorrow and helped the audience experience the feelings of the victims. This book can be used in an educational setting by teaching students about weather and the protocols you need to go through when faced with a situation like Katrina. I would recommend this book for purchase because it teaches the importance of caring for people around the world.

 

 

 

CATEGORY

Sneider Family Book

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Mazer, H., Lerangis, P. (2012). Somebody please tell me who I am. New York: Simon & Schuster

 

SUMMARY

Somebody, Please Tell Me Who I Am is about a young adult named Ben who is in a Broadway musical, and his family and friends find out that he is going to boot camp training for the military. He faces tragedy and hardship when he is hurt on duty, which resulted in him having memory loss. There are no visual illustrations, but Mazer and Lerangis uses imagery to help the reader evoke images for every scene that takes place in this timely novel.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover, Teen Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 11 and up

 

Awards: 2013 Sneider Family Book Award for Teen

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

I believe that this story would be appealing to children eleven years and older because it connects to how the military is here to serve and protect our country. Using this in an educational setting, can provide a way for students to talk about people they know who are serving in the military. There can be a project on American heroes who served in the military to bring awareness to historical figures. I would recommend this book for purchase because it highlights what a true American hero is and how they fight for their country, but also fight to get back to their family.

CATEGORY

Folk Tale

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Isaacs, A. (2010). Dust devil. (P. Zelinsky, Illus.). New York: Schwartz & Wade Books

SUMMARY

Dust Devil is about a woman named Swamp Angel who moved from Tennessee to Montana because she became too big for the state. While she was there she met a horse that she named Dust Devil that was big enough to carry her. Illustrator Paul Zelinsky, uses oil on veneer paper to create the humorous illustrations that are visible throughout this story.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover, Adventure

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 1 – 3

 

Awards: 2012 – 2013 Pennsylvania Young Reader’s Choice Award

2011 Irma Black Award Nominee

2010 Notable Children’s Book

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

I think that this book would be appealing to children because of its witty illustrations. Each illustration showed how dynamic each creature or character was important to each scene. Dust Devil could be used in an educational setting to learn about the state of Montana and the nature of how a dust storm forms. Personally, I would not recommend this book to be purchased in a school library because it can seem confusing because of the unparalleled storytelling along with the witty illustrations.

CATEGORY

Historical Fiction

BILBIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Holm, J. (2016). Full of beans. New York: Random House Children’s Books

SUMMARY

Full of Beans takes place in the year of 1934 in Key West, California during the Great Depression. The story talks about the Diaper Gang and how it influenced the lives of Bean’s community. Beans had to learn from his mistakes that had dire consequences, but through this he could use his leadership skills to the benefit of the town. Author Jennifer Holm, uses local color to help the imagery of the Great Depression come to live in the reader’s mind.

Genre & Format: Hardback, Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 3 – 6

 

Awards: 2016 New York Public Library Best Book for Kids

2017 Scott O’Dell Award Winner

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Full of Beans would be appealing because Beans is a likable character, but it will also be a good way for them to analyze the choices that were made throughout the book. I would use this book in an educational setting to teach about the Great Depression. This book is a good tool to use for guided discussions to talk about the issues of poverty and what can we do as a community to help. I would purchase Full of Beans for school libraries because it is a fun way of teaching historical fiction to children to maintain their attention.

CATEGORY

Historical Fiction

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Erdrich, L. (2005). The game of silence. New York: HarperCollins Publishers

SUMMARY

The Game of Silence takes place in 1849, when the Ojibwe tribe was told that they had to move west because of the removal order that the president of the chimookomanag set. The children of the Ojibwe tribe play a game of silence which the winner receives a prize. The limited illustration presented in this novel are hand drawn and represent some of the detailed sentences offered in the story.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover, Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 6 – 13

 

Awards: 2006 Scott O’Dell Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This novel would be appealing to children because it teaches about Native American and European settlers. Each illustration is tribal like and is placed on the page without color to not overpower the novel but enhance the reading just enough. You could use this book in a class setting by teaching students about the Ojibwe tribe and center a project assignment around the 1800’s. The Game of Silence should be purchased because it introduces students to history and the relationship between Native Americans and European settlers.

CATEGORY

Fantasy

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

White, E. B. (1980). Charlotte’s web. (G. Williams, Illus.). New York: HarperCollins Publishers

SUMMARY

Charlotte’s Web is about a pig named Wilbur who was born a runt, and was going to be eaten for dinner but Fern convinces Mr. Arable not to kill him. Wilber is sold to Fern’s uncle and he makes a friend in Charlotte who promises Wilbur that he will not be eaten at Christmastime. Illustrator Garth Williams, hand draws each image to captivate the important characters and scenes in the book.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Fiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 5 – 12

 

Awards: 1953 Newbery Honor

1970 George C. Stone Center for Children’s Books Recognition of Merit Award

1984 Massachusetts Children’s Book Award

1970 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This well-known story would be appealing to any grade level because it teaches students the importance of friendship and the miracle of saving a life. Each image presented in Charlotte’s Web has very intricate detailing and makes the audience see each image as if it were in color. Charlotte’s Web can be used in an educational setting to teach about how spiders differ from other insects or creating a fair where students can bring in their own animals or the teacher bringing in someone from the outside to introduce students to different insects and animals. I would recommend this book for school libraries because it shows different emotions in the book which is a good opportunity to ask students about their feelings.

CATEGORY

Fantasy

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Collins, S. (2008). Hunger games. Holland: Scholastic Press

SUMMARY

The Hunger Games is about a girl named Kat who takes her sister’s spot to become a contender of a game for the amusement of the capitol. Each contender must fight to the death and Kat must rely on her own skills to survive the game. The author uses imagery instead of physical images to portray each scene taken place in the book.

Genre & Format: Audiobook, Children’s

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 5 – 8

 

Awards: 2009Georgia Peach Book Award

2009 Buxtehuder Bulle

2009 Golden Duck Award for Hal Clement Award for Young Adult

2012 Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers

2010 West Australian Young Readers’ Book Award (WAYRBA) for Older Readers

2011 Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award

2010 Red House Children’s Book Award for Older Readers & Overall

2011 South Carolina Book Award for Junior and Young Adult Book

2010 Charlotte Award

2010 Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award

2009 Teen Buckeye Book Award

2010 Pennsylvania Young Readers’ Choice Award for Young Adults

2010 Rhode Island Teen Book Award

2010 Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award

2011 Evergreen Teen Book Award

2009 Soaring Eagle Book Award

2010 Milwaukee County Teen Book Award Nominee

2010 Sakura Medal for Middle School Book

2009 Michigan Library Association Thumbs Up! Award

2009 Florida Teens Read

2010 Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis for Preis der Jugendjury

2011 Iowa High School Book Award

2011 New Mexico Land of Enchantment Award for Young Adult –

2010 Eliot Rosewater Indiana High School Book Award

2009 The Inky Awards for Silver Inky

2011 Lincoln Award

2010 Kinderboekwinkelprijs

2011 Missouri Truman Readers Award

2008 Cybils Award for Young Adult Fantasy & Science Fiction

2010 Literaturpreis der Jury der jungen Leser for Jugendbuch

2009 The Inky Awards Shortlist for Silver Inky

2011 Prix Et-lisez-moi

2011 Missouri Gateway Readers Award

2011 Oklahoma Sequoyah Award for High School and Intermediate

2009 Premio El Templo de las Mil Puertas for Mejor novela extranjera perteneciente a    

                         saga

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Hunger Games would be appealing to upper elementary grade levels because of its connection to the world around them. The reader uses imagery to create the images of the capitol and of the game to put themselves in the shoes of each character. This book can be used in an educational setting to talk about war and the government and how this affects us daily. I would recommend purchasing Hunger Games in school libraries because it is a good way to introduce drama and a student’s love for action.

CATEGORY

Tomas Rivera or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Campoy, I. and Howell, T. (2016). Maybe something beautiful. (R. Lopez, Illus.). New York: HMH Books for Young Readers

SUMMARY

Maybe Something Beautiful is a true story about a girl named Mira who loved to paint, doodle or draw when there was a piece of paper that she had seen in front of her. Mira met a muralist and together they brought the community together through painting. The illustrations presented in this story use a combination of digital art and acrylic on wood to help tell this true story.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Fiction

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 3 – 6

 

Awards: 2016 Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Picture Books

2017 Charlotte Zolotow Award Nominee

2017 Tomas Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award

2017 CLEL Bell Picture Book Awards Nominee for Write

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Children will be drawn to this story because of the connection to the world around them. Rafael Lopez showed the love and compassion that Mira has for painting through each vibrant illustration. Maybe Something Beautiful can be used in an educational setting to show how one person can make a difference in their community no matter the size of the deed. This story should be purchased in school libraries because it helps children establish ways of giving back to their community and how transformation can be turned into impact.

CATEGORGY

Tomas Rivera or Honor

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Tafolla, C. (2009). What can you do with a paleta. (M. Morales, Illus.). Berkeley: Tricycle Press

SUMMARY

What Can You Do with a Paleta is about a young girl who wonders what can you do with a paleta (popsicle). During the story, the girl makes new friends and decides what she likes best about a paleta. Illustrator Magaly Morales, uses acrylic to create the warm colors that brings the reader to a day during the summer.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 1 – 3

 

Awards: 2010 Charlotte Zolotow Award

2010 Americas Award

2010 Tomas Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

What Can You Do with a Paleta would be appealing to lower elementary students because it shows them that everyone eats popsicles just like them. The illustrations are based around three main colors and uses swirl and curve like movement to indicate the tasty treat. I would use this book in an educational setting to introduce students to a different language, since the book is written in English and Spanish. This could also be a way to give students a paleta to eat while enjoying the story while the teacher is reading. I would recommend purchasing this story for school libraries because it is a good tool to try to learn a student’s home language, while providing a way to help students connect through friendship.

CATEGORY

Graphic Novel

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Gaiman, N. (2008). Coraline. (C. Russell, Illus.). New York: Harper Collins Publishers

SUMMARY

This graphic novel is about a girl named Coraline who just moved into a new house with her family. Coraline discovers a door and she goes through to find that there is another mother and father on the other side. Illustrator Craig Russell, combine hand drawn and digital imagery to create the illustrations in this comedic horror novel.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Horror, Comedy and Humor

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages8 – 13

 

Awards: Harvey and Eisner Awards

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Coraline would be appealing to the ages of eight to thirteen because of the combination of horror and comedy. The illustrations are full of color and detail which helps show the horror of the story and the way Coraline feels. To be honest, this is not a book that should be used in an educational setting but as a story that is read for pleasure outside of the classroom. I would not recommend purchasing this book for school libraries because it can seem scary to some children and should be approved by the student’s parents before they read it.

CATEGORY

Science Fiction

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Carvell, T. (2014). Return to planet tad. (D. Holgate, Illus.). New York: HarperCollins Publishers

SUMMARY

Return to Planet Tad is about a boy Tad who is in the eighth grade that writes a blog. He writes a daily entry each day from January to December, which includes things like getting a cell phone or trying to figure out what a saying means. Illustrator Doug Holgate, hand draws each image with humor and it shows how the main character is feeling during each journal entry with the emoticon images.

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Humorous Fiction

 

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Grades 3 – 7

 

Awards: Not Applicable/didn’t find anything

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

This humorous blog story is appealing to children because it shows the connection to a social media platform. The illustration brings character to Return to Planet Tad and how a day is in Tad’s eyes. Students can use this book in school to create their own newspaper or creating a school channel to talk about the important highlights that the school has each day. This can also be a way for students to keep daily journals of their own in the classroom or at home. I would recommend this book to be purchased in a school library because it is a good book for students that are not enthusiastic about reading to read.

CATEGORY

Science Fiction

 

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

Byars, B. (1984). The computer nut. (G. Byars, Illus.). New York: Viking Penguin Inc.

SUMMARY

The Computer Nut is about a girl named Kate who loves computers and gets this email from an alien named BB-9. Kate is determined to find out who it is, so her and her crush Willie schedule to meet with BB-9 in person. The limited illustrations in the book are hand drawn by piecing together basic shapes.

 

Genre & Format: Hardcover; Sci-Fi, Children’s Literature

Suggested Age or Grade Level(s): Ages 7 – 10

 

Awards: 1986 Charlie May Simon Children’s Book Award

 

PERSONAL REFLECTION OR REVIEW

Children would be drawn to this story because it gives an understanding of how the computers works.The Computer Nut can be used in an educational setting to bring awareness to the dangers of chatting with a stranger online. This could be an opportunity for students to be given a pen pal on a safe and secure website. Even though this book is really dated, I think it should be purchased in school libraries because it is a good tool to teach students the right and wrong way of using computers.

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